Who defeated the Byzantine empire, and why were they able to do it?

Answers

Answer 1
Answer:

Answer:

Ottoman Turk

Explanation:

The Byzantine Empire fell in 1453, The cause of its fall was pressure by the Ottoman Turk. The Ottomans had been fighting the Byzantines for over 100 years. In 1454, Constantinople finally fell to them and their conquest of the Byzantine Empire was finally complete.


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What is the song Stop This Train about in Meyer's own words?

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Answer:

In this song, Mayer uses a train to symbolize time. He thinks that time is moving too fast and that his parents are aging quickly.

Explanation:

hope it helps

How does acquiring Texas and Oregon fulfil the concept of Manifest Destiny?

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Answer:

Manifest destiny was an idea that gave Americans a destine by God to govern.

Explanation:

The motive behind the expansion into Texas and Oregon was the Manifest destiny. The idea to settle n Texas and Oregon came in answer to the United States annexation of Texas and conflict over the Oregon Country with British, which ultimately became part of America. The main goal was to spread its white American settlers in the westward region. The settlers move and expand across America to spread their traditions and their institutions. They began to buy land and settle there to do farming and ranching and cattle keeping.

How did queen Hatshepsut’s Policies affect the kingdom of Egypt?

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Traditionally, Egyptian kings defended their land against the enemies who lurked at Egypt's borders. Hatshepsut's reign was essentially a peaceful one, and her foreign policy was based on trade rather than war.

Answer:

If you are it is A.

Explanation:

The economy expaned greatly as a result of trade

The Mashpee Wampanoag Tribe's struggle to keep and maintain control over their lands is an example of astruggle for
?

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A few villages were surrounded by log walls for safety. For traveling they made canoes, by hollowing out big bushes. The men might use the canons to fish, and they might additionally go and hunt deer, turkey, and small sports.

What's the Mashpee Wampanoag tribe recognized for?

The Mashpee Wampanoag Tribe also called the people of the primary mild, has inhabited gift-day Massachusetts and eastern Rhode Island for more than 12,000 years.

After a hard method lasting greater than 3 decades, the Mashpee Wampanoag had been re-recounted as a federally diagnosed tribe in 2007.

Learn more about Mashpee Wampanoag Tribe here: brainly.com/question/2049102

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Answer:

The Mashpee Wampanoag Tribe, also known as the People of the First Light, has inhabited present day Massachusetts and Eastern Rhode Island for more than 12,000 years. After an arduous process lasting more than three decades, the Mashpee Wampanoag were re-acknowledged as a federally recognized tribe in 2007.

What religious differences existed between the Ottomans and the Safavids?A. The Ottomans tolerated other religions and the Safavids did not.
B. The Safavids were Shiite Muslims and the Ottomans were Sunni Muslims.
C. The Ottomans enslaved all non-Muslims; the Safavids encouraged the economic contributions of non-Muslims.
D. The Safavids deported all non-Muslims from the empire.

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Answer:

The Correct Answer is B

Explanation:

  • The protracted struggle between the Ottomans and the Safavids was based on regional and theological disagreements. Both numerous imperialism endeavored to dominate immense townships in present-day Iraq, along the Caspian and their bilateral boundaries.
  • The Safavids were Shiite Muslims and the Ottomans were Sunni Muslims. bearing non-Muslims and supporting their financial grants.

B. I believe the answers is

Why were schools desegregated in the 1960s?

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Answer:

Explanation:

The Supreme Court's decision in Brown v. Board marked a shining moment in the NAACP's decades-long campaign to combat school segregation. In declaring school segregation as unconstitutional, the Court overturned the longstanding “separate but equal” doctrine established nearly 60 years earlier in Plessy v.