Research will be presented by einstein at the conference. change that into an active sentence ​

Answers

Answer 1
Answer:

Answer:

research is being presented by einstein at the conference.


Related Questions

Which of the following sentences includes an example of personification? Select all that apply."Starvation seemed to stare them in the face.""All through that summer the work of the farm went like clockwork.""The news of what had happened sped round the farm like wildfire.""The pigs did not actually work, but directed and supervised the others."
Which sentence in this excerpt from F Scott Fitzgerald’s winter dreams seem to foreshadow Dexters future obsession with
.The following question has two parts. Answer Part A first, and then Part B.Do not feed the animals. Visitors must not touch the animals’ cages.Part AWhat is the mood of the verb do in the first of the following sentences?a.indicativeb.imperativec.interrogatived.conditional
How does mr frank react to dussels arrival from mr van daans
Which type of sentence is classified as an independent clause?A. compound sentenceB. complex sentenceC. simple sentenceD. complete sentence

Why has Hale lost the authority he possessed at the beginning of the play?

Answers

Answer: He got too old

Explanation:

The development of ____ factored in the development of complex organisms.a.
ozone
c.
cyanobacteria
b.
oxygen
d.
all of the above

Answers

Answer:

D.all of the above.

If it worng, then sorry.

Hope it helps you

All the sentences have one mistake. Rewrite them correctly.
She can to drive.

Answers

Answer:

She can't drive or She can drive

Explanation:

She can to drive, the presence of the preposition 'to' in the sentence renders it grammatically incorrect.

The statement can either be written as :

She can not drive or simply ;

She can't drive

Or removing the 'to' permanently :

She can drive

Once, a very long time ago, a man named Amak awoke in the morning and was very hungry—he wanted some dinner. Before the sun rose over the mountains, he left his family and promised to bring food home to them. Amak, whose stomach growled, knew his family was famished—and so was he. As he trudged along, Amak realized he had been walking for a long time. He wanted to find food quickly and take it home to his family.2Amak walked through the forest to find food. He looked into the trees to find birds and scoured bushes hoping to find a rabbit. He became frustrated when he found nothing. Amak knew he had to keep searching, though, because his family was counting on him.
How does the setting of the story make it more effective?

Answers

Answer:  lonely and wild answer b

Explanation:

USA test prep

Answer:

" sun rose over the mountains"

"walked through the forest"

These kinds of phrases help us know what is going on in the story. For example, if the story said, "Amak walked for a while to find some food", we don't know where he is, or why he would be looking for food while he was walking. For all we know he could me walking around his house.

Setting is really impotent because it gives the readers visuals. A good writer will help the reader see the area around the character and help them visualize what is happening.

Hope this helps :)

In November 1964, after a six-month trial, Lenny Bruce was found guilty of obscenity by the state of NewYork for language he had used in a stand-up comedy routine. Sentenced to four months' imprisonment,
Bruce never served a day, he died while appealing his conviction Bruce was officially pardoned by New
York Governor George Pataki in 2003—the first posthumous pardon in New York history. Pataki claimed
that the pardon was "a declaration of New York's commitment to upholding the First Amendment," which
guarantees freedom of speech.
Question
Governor Pataki implied that Lenny Bruce should not have
O used profane language
been found guilty
O appealed his conviction
o violated the First Amendment

Answers

Answer:

Governor Pataki implied that Lenny Bruce should not have been found guilty.

Explanation:

By pardoning Lenny Bruce, Governor George Pataki implied that Bruce should not have been found guilty. All Bruce did was use profane language during a stand-up comedy routine. That wasn't something he should've been sentenced for, and Pataki realizes that. The First Amendment guarantees the freedom of speech, and by sentencing Bruce to imprisonment for obscene language, the judge violated that right.

The following directions are found at the beginning of a cookbook:1. Always use Pillsbury's Best Flour.

2. Sift flour twice before adding to cakes or breakfast cakes.

3. Make all measurements level by using edge of knife to lightly scrape off from top of cup or spoon until material is even with the edges.

4. Use same sized cups or spoons in measuring for the same recipe.

5. Before starting to make recipe, read through carefully, then put on table all the materials and tools needed in making that particular recipe.

Based on the passage, the word LEVEL used in #3 most likely means a.to make sure all measurements are the same size.
b.to get rid of any excess ingredients.
c.to scrape spilled ingredients off the counter.
d.to fill the measuring cups to the edge.

Answers

The answer is d to fill the measuring cups to the edge

Final answer:

The term 'level', in this cooking context, refers to removing any excess ingredients so that what remains is exactly even with the edge of the measuring cup or spoon.

Explanation:

In the directions provided at the beginning of the cookbook, the word 'level', as used in statement #3, most likely refers to the act of getting rid of any excess ingredients beyond the edge of the measuring cup or spoon.

This is accomplished by using the edge of a knife to lightly scrape off the excess, ensuring the material is flush or 'level' with the edges of the cup or spoon. This technique ensures accurate measurements while baking.

Learn more about Vocabulary comprehension here:

brainly.com/question/32749584

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Other Questions
Instructions:Write a prose paraphrase of Robert Browning's poem. Your paraphrase should be approximately as long as the poem--at least 350 words. Look up the meaning of any words that may be unfamiliar to you.My Last DuchessThat's my last Duchess painted on the wall,Looking as if she were alive. I callThat piece a wonder, now: Fra Pandolf's handsWorked busily a day, and there she stands.Will't please you sit and look at her? I said"Fra Pandolf" by design, for never readStrangers like you that pictured countenance,The depth and passion of its earnest glance,But to myself they turned (since none puts byThe curtain I have drawn for you, but I)And seemed as they would ask me, if they durstHow such a glance came there; so, not the firstAre you to turn and ask thus Sir, 'twas notHer husband's presence only, called that spotOf joy into the Duchess' cheek: perhapsFra Pandolf chanced to say "Her mantle lapsOver my lady's wrist too much," or "PaintMust never hope to reproduce the faintHalf-flush that dies along her throat": such stuffWas courtesy, she thought, and cause enoughFor calling up that spot of joy. She hadA heart—how shall I say?—too soon made glad,Too easily impressed; she liked whate'erShe looked on, and her looks went everywhere.Sir, 'twas all one! My favor at her breast,The dropping of the daylight in the West,The bough of cherries some officious foolBroke in the orchard for her, the white muleShe rode with round the terrace—all and eachWould draw from her alike the approving speech,Or blush, at least. She thanked men—good! but thankedSomehow—I know not how—as if she rankedMy gift of a nine-hundred-years-old nameWith anybody's gift. Who'd stoop to blameIn speech—(which I have not)—to make your willQuite clear to such an one, and say, "Just thisOr that in you disgusts me; here you miss,Or there exceed the mark"—and if she letHerself be lessoned so, nor plainly setHer wits to yours, forsooth, and made excuse—E'en then would be some stooping; and I chooseNever to stoop. Oh sir, she smiled, no doubt,Whene'er I passed her; but who passed withoutMuch the same smile? This grew; I gave commands;Then all smiles stopped together. There she standsAs if alive. Will't please you rise? We'll meetThe company below, then. I repeat,The Count your master's known munificenceIs ample warrant that no just pretenseOf mine for dowry will be disallowed;Though his fair daughter's self, as I avowedAt starting, is my object. Nay, we'll goTogether down, sir. Notice Neptune, though,Taming a sea horse, thought a rarity,Which Claus of Innsbruck cast in bronze for me!Do not copy the other answer!!!