You are the CFO of a publicly-traded company in a very competitive industry. You are preparing the annual report and SEC filings and you are carefully considering how much information to provide. You fear that your competitors could gain some advantage if you present too much detail but you know that investors want more detail so they can evaluate the business (and management) performance. How do you handle these conflicting elements?

Answers

Answer 1
Answer:

Answer:

Investors structure is a significant part of an organization. In this manner, it is important to provide the significant data so they can take inform decision. The yearly report give the imperative data the utilization of which they can shape solid justification for taking choices. In any case, most of the time, dominant part of the investors/speculators barely spend their valuable time on examining every single figure gave in the financials. They experience the nuts and bolts and basics as it were. In this manner just material realities must be unveiled in the reports as contenders might be peering toward on the subtleties. That is, it is significant not to reveal the "exchange insider facts" of the organization in its reports. A lot of data prompts data over-burden with which contenders may exploit. It ought to likewise be dealt with that what must be incorporated is incorporated as a general rule.

Answer 2
Answer:

Final answer:

As a CFO of a publicly-traded company, one should focus on providing meaningful and relevant information to shareholders without revealing strategic specifics that would benefit competitors. This balance can be achieved through effective disclosure management.

Explanation:

As the CFO of a publicly-traded company, you must balance between sharing too much information which can aid your competitors and offering comprehensive details to investors for performance evaluation. The key to resolving this conflict lies in disclosure management. More specifically, you should focus on providing meaningful and relevant information to support investors' decision-making without revealing strategic specifics that would help competitors. For example, quantitative information related to sales, cost, profit, and balance sheet items could be released, along with commentary on operational and financial performance. However, strategic plans, detailed product plans and similar items that could give an advantage to competitors should not be disclosed.

Learn more about Disclosure Management here:

brainly.com/question/31540671

#SPJ3


Related Questions

Loki, Inc. and​ Thor, Inc. have entered into a​ stock-swap merger agreement whereby Loki will pay a 39% premium over​ Thor's pre-merger price. If​ Thor's pre-merger price per share was $42 and​ Loki's was $51​, what exchange ratio will Loki need to​ offer?
IIIYou have been asked to prepare the final accounts forW Smith, a sole trader, for the year ended 31 December2013. W Smith has forwarded to you all books of primeentry and ledgers, and in addition has given you thefollowing information:1) Mr Smith had taken £2,000 out of the business bankaccount to take his wife on holiday.ii) Up to last year the machinery and vehicle used inthe business had been depreciated using the reducingbalance method. W Smith thinks that they should nowbe depreciated using the straight-line method.iii) Mr Smith is confident, given his order book thatthe business will continue to operate in its presentform for many years.iv) Mr Smith had purchased ten staplers, four flipcharts and four packets of whiteboard markers whichwill be used in the business for the next couple ofyears.V)Mr Smith informs you that he has just found anunopened electricity bill for £900 which was for thequarter October to December 2013RequiredIn each case, identify and then explain the mainaccounting concepts being highlighted and indicatehow each should be treated in the final accounts.​
What is the most appropriate decision on a product line when a company decides to lengthen its product line beyond its current range
FFDP Corp. has yearly sales of $29.8 million and costs of $15.5 million. The company’s balance sheet shows debt of $55.8 million and cash of $39.8 million. There are 1,960,000 shares outstanding and the industry EV/EBITDA multiple is 9.3. What is the company’s enterprise value? (Do not round intermediate calculations and enter your answer in dollars, not millions of dollars, rounded to the nearest whole number, e.g., 1,234,567.) What is the stock price per share? (Do not round intermediate calculations and round your answer to 2 decimal places, e.g., 32.16.)
North Carolina State University Irwin College of Engineering can earn 4% on its investments, how much should be in its savings account to fund one $5,000 scholarship each year for the next 10 years?

Zebra Company reports the following figures for the years ending December 31, 2017 and 2016: What are the percentage changes from 2016 to 2017 for Net Sales, Cost of Goods Sold and Gross Profit, respectively? (Round your final answers to one decimal place, X.X%) A. 100%, 162.5%, 10.8% B. 37.8%, 10.8%, 162.5% C. 100%, 0.9%, 0.4% D. 162.5%, 37.8%, 10.8%

Answers

Answer:

B. 37.8%, 10.8%, 162.5%

Explanation:

1. Changes in Net Sales

We know,

Percentage changes in Net sales from previous year to current year =

(2017 Net income - 2016 Net income)/(2016 Net income)

Given,

Net Sales_(2017) = $62,000

Net Sales_(2016) = $45,000

Therefore,

Percentage changes in Net Sales = (62,000 - 45,000)/(45,000)

Percentage changes in Net Sales = 37.8% (Rounded to 1 decimal Places)

Therefore, Net sales changes 37.8% from 2016 to 2017.

2. Changes in Cost of Goods sold

We know,

Percentage changes in Cost of goods sold from previous year to current year = (2017 COGS - 2016 COGS)/(2016 COGS)

Given,

COGS_(2017) = $41,000

COGS_(2016) = $37,000

Putting the value in the above formula,

Percentage changes in COGS = (41,000 - 37,000)/(37,000)

Percentage changes in COGS = 10.8%

Therefore, Cost of goods sold changes 10.8% from 2016 to 2017.

3. Changes in Gross Profit

We know,

Percentage changes in Gross Profit from previous year to current year = (2017 Gross Profit - 2016 Gross Profit)/(2016 Gross Profit)

Given,

Gross Profit_(2017) = $21,000

Gross Profit_(2016) = $8,000

Hence,

Percentage changes in Gross Profit = (21,000 - 8,000)/(8,000)

Percentage changes in Gross Profit = 162.5%

Therefore, Gross Profit changes 162.5% from 2016 to 2017.

What is your standard deviation of demand during lead time if your average lead time = 5 days, standard deviation of demand = 4, average demand is 12, and standard deviation of lead time is 1.2 days.

Answers

Answer:

4.47

Explanation:

The computation of the standard deviation of lead time is shown below:

= √lead time × standard deviation of demand

= √ 5 days × 4

= √20

= 4.47

We simply applied the above formula to determine the standard deviation of demand during lead time

Hence, all the other items would be ignored

Final answer:

The standard deviation of demand during lead time, given an average lead time of 5 days, standard deviation of demand of 4, average demand of 12, and standard deviation of lead time of 1.2 days, can be calculated using a specific formula. The result after substituting the given values into the formula and simplifying is approximately 15.9.

Explanation:

The standard deviation of demand during lead time can be determined using the formula for the standard deviation, which states that the standard deviation of demand during lead time is the square root of (Average lead time * (standard deviation of demand)^2) + (average demand^2 * (standard deviation of lead time)^2).

So you would plug in the given values:
√[(5 * (4)^2) + ((12)^2 * (1.2)^2)]
= √[80 + 172.8]
= √252.8
≈ 15.9

So the standard deviation of demand during lead time is approximately 15.9.

Learn more about Standard Deviation here:

brainly.com/question/31516010

#SPJ3

Dana has a portfolio of 8 securities, each with a market value of $5,000. The current beta of the portfolio is 1.28 and the beta of the riskiest security is 1.75. Dana wishes to reduce her portfolio beta to 1.15 by selling the riskiest security and replacing it with another security with a lower beta. What must be the beta of the replacement security? a. 1.21 b. 0.91 c. 0.73 d. 1.62

Answers

Answer:

Option c. 0.73

Explanation:

Data provided in the question:

Market value of securities = $5,000

Current beta of the portfolio = 1.28

Beta of the riskiest security = 1.75

Required beta = 1.15

Now,

let the beta of the other security be 'x'

Portfolio beta = weighted average of individual betas in the portfolio

or

1.28 × 8 × $5000 = [  x × (8 - 1) × $5000 ] + [ 1.75 × $5000  ]

or

$51,200 = $35,000x + $8750

or

$35,000x = $42,450

or

x = 1.21

Thus,

If she wishes to reduce the beta to 1.15, by replacing the riskiest security,

let the beta of the replacement security be 'y'

Therefore,

1.15 × 8 × $5000 = [ 1.21 × (8 - 1 ) × $5000 ] + [ y × $5000  ]

or

$46,000 = $42,350 + $5,000y

or

$5,000y = $3,650

or

y = 0.73

Hence,

Option c. 0.73

Consumption spending is:__________ A. spending by households, businesses, and government on all goods used up within one year. B. spending by individuals and households on both durable and nondurable goods. C. spending on goods and services by heads of households. D. spending by individuals and households on only nondurable goods, since they are used up quickly.

Answers

Answer:

b. spending by individuals and households on only non-durable goods.

Explanation:

Consumption spending is spending by individuals and households on only non-durable goods. Consumption is a component of GDP which includes spending on goods and services by individuals and households as it includes non-durable as well as durable goods on the basis of consumption patterns.

A bank estimates that its profit next year is normally distributed with a mean of 0.8% of assets and the standard deviation of 2% of assets. How much equity (as a percentage of assets) does the company need to be (a) 99% sure that it will have a positive equity at the end of the year and (b) 99.9% sure that it will have positive equity at the end of the year

Answers

Answer:

a) 5.45%

b) 6.98%

Explanation:

We are given the following information in the question:

Mean, μ = 0.8%

Standard Deviation, σ = 2%

We are given that the distribution of profit is a bell shaped distribution that is a normal distribution.

Formula:

z_(score) = \displaystyle(x-\mu)/(\sigma)

a) We have to find the value of x such that the probability is 0.99

P(X < x)  

P( X < x) = P( z < \displaystyle(x - 0.8)/(2))=0.99  

Calculation the value from standard normal z table, we have,  

P(z < 2.326) = 0.99

\displaystyle(x - 0.8)/(2) = 2.326\n\nx = 5.452 \approx 5.45

Thus, 5.45% of assets does the company need to be 99% sure that it will have a positive equity at the end of the year.

b) We have to find the value of x such that the probability is 0.999

P(X < x)  

P( X < x) = P( z < \displaystyle(x - 0.8)/(2))=0.999  

Calculation the value from standard normal z table, we have,  

P(z < 3.090) = 0.999

\displaystyle(x - 0.8)/(2) = 3.090\n\nx = 6.98

Thus, 6.98% of assets does the company need to be 99% sure that it will have a positive equity at the end of the year.

Is there too much pressure on girls to have perfect bodies?

Answers

yes because girls feel like they have to please everyone and leave up to people expectations
Other Questions
Broomhilda manufactures broomsticks for her fellow witch (and wizard) friends. Broomhilda uses a job order cost system and applies overhead to production on the basis of direct labor cost. On September 1, Job 50 (a super deluxe broom complete with a separate sleep space and shower area as well as an espresso machine) was the only job in process. The costs incurred prior to September on this job were as follows: direct materials $20,000, direct labor $12,000, and manufacturing overhead $16,000. As of September 1, Job 49 (a broom shaped like a cat with some extra cargo space for all the cats) had been completed at a cost of $90,000 and was part of finished goods inventory. There was a $15,000 balance in the Raw Materials Inventory account. During the month of September, Broomhilda began production on Jobs 51 and 52, and completed Jobs 50 and 51. Jobs 49 and 50 were also sold on account during the month for $122,000 and $158,000, respectively. The following additional events occurred during the month.1. Purchased additional raw materials of $90,000 on account.2. Incurred manufacturing overhead costs as follows: indirect materials $17,000 (including broom polish and specially crafted scissors to trim stray twigs), indirect labor $20,000 (Hansel and Gretel clean the shop and run errands for the elves), depreciation expense on equipment $12,000 (Broomhilda has multiple molding stations for each broom she creates), and various other manufacturing overhead costs on account $16,000.3. Assigned direct materials and direct labor to jobs as follows: Job no. Direct Materials Direct Labor50 10,000 5,00051 39,000 25,00052 30,000 20,000Required:a. Calculate the predetermined overhead rate for September, assuming Broomhilda estimates total manufacturing overhead costs of $840,000 and direct labor costs of $700,000 for September.b. Open job cost sheets for Jobs 50, 51, and 52. Enter the September 1 balances on the job cost sheet for Job 50.c. Prepare the journal entries to record the purchase of raw materials, and the manufacturing overhead costs incurred during the month of March.d. Prepare the summary journal entries to record the assignment of direct materials, direct labor, and manufacturing overhead costs to production. In assigning overhead costs, use the overhead rate calculated in (1). Post all costs to the job cost sheets as necessary.e. Total the job cost sheets for any job(s) completed during the month. Prepare the journal entry (or entries) to record the completion of any job(s) during the month.f. Prepare the journal entry (or entries) to record the sale of any job(s) during the month.g. What is the balance in the Finished Goods Inventory account at the end of the month? What job(s) does this balance consist of? 8. What is the amount of over- or underapplied overhead? Prepare the journal entry to close this to Cost of Goods Sold